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U.S. Secretary of Education holds town hall on education, economy

01 Dec 2011 11:18 AM | Anonymous

Hundreds of people turned out for a town hall meeting with U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, held Tuesday, Nov. 29, at the College of Southern Nevada in Las Vegas. The meeting was meant to address education’s role in improving the economy.

Nevada System of Higher Education Chancellor Dan Klaich moderated the hour-long town hall, which also included panelists from local education and the community: Dwight Jones, superintendent of Clark County Schools; Ruben Murillo, president of Clark County Education Association; Calvin Rock, former pastor of Abundant Life Seventh Day Adventist Church; Luis Valera, board chair of the Latin Chamber of Commerce; and Elaine Wynn, chair for Communities in Schools and co-chair of the Greater Las Vegas After School All-Stars.

“We have to educate our way to a better economy,” said Duncan, according to a Las Vegas Sun report. “In a competitive, knowledge-based economy, jobs are going to go where the knowledge workers are ... We can’t teeter around the edges; we have to look for radical change.”

“Nevada’s education system plays a critical role in our state's economy and will take on an even greater role as we seek to create a better educated workforce and to better align our education system with economic opportunities,” Klaich added, in a statement. “Nevada’s students are our future and it will take a community effort to make sure we are providing them with the right access and quality to ensure their success and ultimately, the success of our state.”

The town hall meeting was part of an ongoing discussion Duncan is holding with similar town halls around the country and via social media. To hear his Dec. 1 interview on KNPR’s State of Nevada, click here.

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